fort collins graphic recorderr

Reflection & Vision - A Custom Tool to Help You Design Your Life

Hello and Happy Holidays friends!

I hope so far yours have been filled with laughter, light, and lots of merriment.

It’s wild to think that this will be the last email to you all in 2016. Last year at this time I wrote about the power of having a clear vision for the next year(s), and how I like to create a Vision Board each New Year. I’ll definitely be taking some time to be intentional, plan and set goals for 2017.

One thing we may not take enough time to do for ourselves is to look back and appreciate what we’ve accomplished. Making time to think about what I’ve done helps keep me energized. In the day-to-day, it’s easy to be caught up in what’s next, what didn’t get done, which graphic recording or video client I need to communicate with, what deadline is around the corner. It’s all important. And so is wrapping your head around what you’ve finished, nailed, achieved, sailed beyond, and rocked. Reflection can also be a time to learn from your year – things often go differently than we plan and sitting with and open mind and reflecting on what you’d do differently helps you improve and refine your work.

So go ahead, pour yourself some tea (or wine) and take some time to reflect on what you’re proud of in 2016, and visualize the year ahead. I’ve created this custom, printable template to help you get started, or feel free to create your own from scratch!

Right click then select download to save and print your own!

Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.

Cheers, Karina

Want to create a beautiful, visual plan of action for 2017 with your team? Click the button to find out how we can work together to create a vision and strategies that you'll actually want to look at every day.
 

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

As you read this, I’ll be on the first leg of a two-week trip to Samburu, Kenya. This will be my fifth time taking students from Colorado State University to a rural community where we’ll be helping Unity Women’s Village with whatever small building project they need, teaching in schools, listening to students’ stories who are attending high school through scholarships, and discussing conservation with young girls in the community. Mostly though, we’ll be learning, building relationships, and thinking about some of the world’s most intense challenges: poverty, access to health care, women’s rights, access to clean water, culture and technology, equality…the list goes on. We will have irregular internet access so thanks in advance for your patience until January 13. To keep friends and families in the loop, the students be posting stories and photos to this blog most days. Happy New Year!

Four Tools Guaranteed to Send Your Team into Decision-Making Bliss

I hope this finds all you folks in the US happy and rested after the Thanksgiving holiday.

My last newsletter focused on suspending judgement while brainstorming to facilitate innovation and creativity, with a promise to follow up this week with ideas to help you or your team make decisions and select the best ideas to move forward with. Okay, maybe you won’t end up completely blissed out if you use these ideas, but at least you’ll have a darn clear picture of what’s important to your team. Which is pretty much the same thing, right?

A graphic recorder can often visually reflect where there is energy or consensus in the group through the illustrations they create, but what if you don’t have a graphic recorder, or the group is having a difficult time deciding?

My first step is usually to have the group create Clusters. When brainstorming, I like to have participants write ideas on sticky notes – one per note – and post them on a wall. This makes it easy to move the ideas around into different themes or categories, which can then simplify or reduce the number of items you need to decide on or prioritize. Be sure to clearly delineate and name the clusters.

Great, now we have a ton of awesome clusters. What now? Now, my friend, you have options (ironic, more decisions for you to make).  Here are some of my favorite decision-making and prioritization techniques, in no particular order, and with endless opportunities to tweak to fit your needs or group.

1.       The Dot Vote: A Classic. Chances are, you’ve used this at least once in your life…If the words “dot vote” make you want to run screaming from the room or throw the device you’re reading this on against a wall, please move on to Idea 2 immediately. However, it’s used often for a reason; it’s quick, can be used in groups of all sizes, and forces people to make tough choices. I usually give people multiple dot stickers so they can give their votes some weight: if you really love an idea, put as many dots on it as you’d like. If you are interested in several, spread your dots around. The caveat is that dot voting might mean an idea that will more heavily affect a minority of the group might get overlooked, even with weighted dot voting.

2.       Five Finger Vote: A la OGSystems Visioneers. This is another quick, weighted voting technique. After generating a list of clusters or key ideas to vote on, discuss them to be sure participants understand each one. Go through them one by one and ask participants to hold up fingers for each as follows:

0: Strong Preference Against (could not accept this idea)

1: Preference Against (accepting this idea would be a compromise to better alternatives)

2: Casual Preference Against (could accept this idea, but other alternatives are just as good)

3: Casual Preference For (could accept this idea, no better alternatives)

4: Preference For (would support this idea, and not prefer another idea)

5: Strong Preference For (could not support another idea)

Count the total for each option – the idea with the highest number of votes is the winner.

3.       Selection Chart: Another Classic. When I need something more analytical and number oriented, creating a chart with options on the left column and criteria for ranking across the top can be useful. Decide on a scale for weight (i.e. 1-5, 5 being most important), and go through each option and give each criterion a number based on how important it is. Again, add up the scores for each option and you’ll get a winner and see distribution of importance. Bonus: You can do this individually first, then come together to discuss patterns or differences across the group.

4.       Decision Trees (for inspiration & humor try this one): A la Dan Roam. Start with an important question, such as “Is dropping our price a good option?”. From there, ask and draw another, related question like “Is our market price sensitive?” decide yes/no, and if yes, ask another question, such as “How is our price relative to our competitor?”. If no, try another option since price isn’t a factor. And so on.

Now get out there and make a blissful Selection Chart to decide which of these tools you’ll use next time your team needs to make a decision.

Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.

Cheers, Karina

Need someone to help your team make some decisions...then actually move forward together? Click to get in touch about your next meeting or event that could use a touch of graphic recording magic.

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

I'm proud to announce a new explainer video is out in the world thanks to the new One Health Institute at Colorado State University! Click the image above to learn how CSU's Dr. John Spencer is partnering with researchers and practitioners in Brazil to work toward ending leprosy!

A Simple Way to Keep from FALL-ing Off the Crushing It Train

We’re entering the last few months of 2016, and I want to encourage you to take a step back from the day-to-day grind for a moment and think about the bigger picture you have for this year.

For those of you who have been with me since last December, this is the perfect time to revisit your Vision Board, or whatever form you might have articulated your goals for the year. If you haven’t written or drawn anything so far, take a few minutes to write down a few goals, ideas, or projects you’d like to mark “Nailed It” when 2017 rolls around.

Now ask yourself:
- What have you completed that deserves celebration?
- What’s still on there you haven’t finished, or maybe even forgot about?
- Are these things still relevant?

Take an honest look -- it’s cool, you still have ¼ of the year left! -- and decide which of these things are your top 3 priorities. Then, whip out that calendar. What do you need to do to achieve these goals? By when? I strongly suggest writing something down or making actionable goals to Get. It. Done.

This is what this looks like for me: I have my vision board posted on the wall at my desk where I see it every day. To take action, I like writing down a running list of my graphic recording & other projects and goals on a whiteboard, also next to my desk. Above that, each evening I write my top 3 priorities for the next day. This helps me keep things organized, and I get to cross things off a list when I complete them. Ahem, like so:

And now, some autumn leaves to inspire seasonal doodles. For fun try using little leaves instead of normal bullet points.

Click on the image below to see the larger version.

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my email newsletter, and I'd be so grateful if you shared it with your friends using those handy links below!

Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.

Cheers, Karina



Need someone to help your team define shared goals...then actually move forward together? Click to get in touch about your next meeting or event that could use a touch of graphic recording magic.

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

The US Fish & Wildlife Service is getting their story on. Here's one of many charts from the four day workshop at the end of September. 

The Secret World of Graphic Recorders: What YOU Can Leverage From Leaders in My Field

Happy September y’all!

Just about a month ago, I was in a place I know you’ve been too: Excitement-Overload. I was headed home from a most amazing gathering of graphic recorders and visual thought leaders: the International Forum of Visual Practitioners (IFVP) annual conference.

These three days play a huge role in the way I approach the next 12 months of the year fueled by ideas and perspectives shared by people who are leading the field and experimenting with new ways of doing this work.

By far the best part of this conference is getting to meet and connect with people whose work I admire and, almost without fail, finding out that there’s a whole lot more to admire in them than their work.

I also had some realizations about the way I want to focus my energy and approach this work to better serve my clients, which I’ve distilled down to a few key insight blasts that can conveniently be used by just about anyone.

Inspired by the brilliant Brandy Agerbeck, I seek to “be a partner, not a commodity”. By that I mean I’m someone my clients continually seek to collaborate with because I’ve done work that makes them want to get out there and really make a difference. Not simply a pretty picture, or even only during the event, but with tools, creative ideas and solutions for using the charts I create long after the event too.

Another session that stuck with me was led by the incredibly intelligent and talented Stephanie Brown on how to be a better partner for facilitators leading change processes. We all came to the conclusion that being a good partner revolves around practicing solid preparation, stellar listening, and letting them know that I have their back, and know they have mine.

Steph also posed the idea that “Organizations grow in the direction from which questions are asked.” I love the idea of crafting questions and visually capturing responses that will help my clients leap forward through uncertainty and change.
 

Lisa Arora, from her deep well of experience and knowledge in this field, shared a question that has me rethinking the way I work with groups: “What do we want people to see, feel, and do?” This deceptively simple question now informs the way I capture different groups and sessions based on their response. Will this be part of a presentation, or is the process of capturing a difficult conversation the most important part of the work I do for a particular client?

As a Creative with a capital “C”, it can be easy to get “comparitis”. What I love about the community of graphic recorders is how generous and supportive everyone is. The last take-away I’ll share comes from Brandy again: There is room for everyone here. The most important thing to do is to be authentic.


Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.

 
Cheers, Karina




Curious how to better utilize your graphic recording charts during and after the meeting? 
 

Hey! It's Time to Recognize!

Sometimes the world takes you by surprise.

Sometimes you think doing something you enjoy is just a hobby, and you like what you’re doing. But surely no one else would pay for it. (More on this little mind quirk coming in June).

There are moments in life when, if we are paying attention, we take a step back and recognize a pattern that keeps emerging. These patterns can be obvious or subtle. Either way, they can be difficult to recognize unless we are open to seeing them.

Heady, Karina. Give me something concrete here. Okay....

I have always loved art, and in fact picked up my first watercolor brush for a botanical study when I was about 7. Art classes were my favorite in school, and I even pursued an art major at CSU for a few semesters before dropping it for environmental communication.

You might be thinking, Right, but you’re an artist.

Too right! But until very recently -- we’re talking 2015 here -- I had this bizarre aversion to considering myself an artist.

Why?

I didn’t want to be a “starving artist” or to get stressed out about something I enjoyed doing if it was my career. And deep down, I didn’t think I could really be talented enough to sell my work as Fine Art. Sure, I had a knack for graphic recording, but that wasn’t Art, it was real-time-visual-distillation-and-synthesis-with-doodles that became my full-time job. Sure, people enjoyed little cards I made them and kept them on their fridges for a while (looking at you, Mike & Shayna). But that was just fun, something I did to keep myself on my toes and show my friends and family I care about them.

I am making a living creating graphic recording charts, which is still amazing to me, and when I shared a few little watercolor paintings I was playing with online, the resounding enthusiasm from viewers (like you) blew me away. To most people, this would be considered being an artist.

And now, finally after many months, years even, I’m opening up and allowing myself to think of me as an Artist. It’s been hugely fun, satisfying and I get to share my light, what I love doing, with others.

Cool, Karina. But what am I supposed to do here? Aren’t you just lucky you get to frolic with a kitten and do art?

There’s an element of luck here, for sure. Being born into a society where I can expect a solid education, and where I have rights and opportunities is really lucky. I also work hard. And I know what I’m doing is making a positive difference in peoples’ lives around me, which motivates that hard work.

So, what can YOU do? Probably a whole heck of a lot of things, and I’d most likely benefit from learning from you. But what I can offer at this wee point in time is this wee thought:

Take a moment to step back. Are there patterns you haven’t let yourself see because you thought they were impossible? Crazy? Impractical? Now, what would happen if you took a step toward that pattern? What would happen if you said “Yes” to whatever keeps tugging at you? Or what if you actually COULD do what you love and be successful with it? Tap into your intuition and let yourself FEEL what’s there.

This isn’t purely for self-interest, although enjoying your work is nice. Knowing your value, what you contribute, and how that fits in with your organization helps teams function more effectively, encourages collaboration and creativity, and boosts productivity.

Click on the image below to see the larger version.

We each have gifts to share with the world. It’s only by letting ourselves be open to giving them can we truly feel fulfilled and make a rockin’ contribution to the world.

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my emails and if you'd like, I'd be so grateful if you shared it with your friends!

Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.

 
Cheers, Karina



Need someone to help you recognize the patterns in your life, then teach you to draw them out? ConverSketch now proudly offers Creative Visual Coaching to help you get your thoughts on paper, and equip you with skills to take action in the future.

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

Researchers at Colorado State University have partnered with Larimer County and the City of Fort Collins to reintroduce genetically pure and disease-free bison to Soapstone Prairie and Red Mountain Open Space in Colorado. This is the story of how the collaboration came to be and what made it a success.

Psst…What’s that behind you? It’s impacting your life more than you realize

You’ve been leaving them behind you all month. All your life, really. You probably let a few slip out behind you today. Sometimes they’re messy, sometimes perfectly designed, sometimes barely discernible, other times they last for weeks. They are uniquely you.

What the heck am I talking about? Footprints.

What do footprints have to do with business? Well, it depends on how you look at it.

Here’s two ways:

What you do impacts those around you, probably more than you realize.  Have you ever thanked someone for a nugget of wisdom they shared that really struck a chord for you, only to have them look at you with a mildly puzzled smile? They don’t even remember what they said, but it shifted the way you looked at life and made a difference for you. On the other end of the spectrum, a flippant and uncaring word can ripple through someone’s life and uproot confidence.

What kind of imprint are you going to leave with those around you? Will it feel like stepping in a mud puddle, or crunching in sparkling snow? (Is stepping in a mud puddle really a bad thing? I don’t think it has to be, which is part of the unshakable optimism that makes me great at getting groups through tough conversations.)

Footprints are also useful tools for change in visual strategic planning.

Having clear steps visually outlined is a super powerful tool to be more productive, synergistic, collaborative and creative with your team. Why?
- You all know where you’re going with a clear vision.
- You all know what’s expected of you within the larger group to make sure the team is successful.
- Everyone understands the mile stones that will keep you moving toward the vision, even if different people approach achieving them different ways.
- And everyone knows how what they’re doing is contributing toward the group’s success. You all know where to find this map, and check in regularly using it as a guide.

So next time your team is meeting to lay things out for the week, or for the next five years, try putting a few footprints on the whiteboard to show the path forward, and fill them in together. Here’s some to get you started…

Click on the image below to see the larger version on the blog.

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my emails and if you'd like, I'd be so pumped if you shared it with your friends!

Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.
 
Cheers, Karina



Is your strategic plan a huge document nobody ever looks at?  Click to get in touch and find out how a custom designed, beautifully succinct strategic plan everybody wants to examine and revisit could be in your future.

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

This month I've officially launched my custom watercolor greeting cards and prints! All cards are 5x7 and printed on recycled paper and paired with recycled envelopes. They come as the individual images above, or with nice, uplifting quotes I've compiled. I'm still working on an online platform to purchase them, but you can email me for a direct order or stop by the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery or Wolverine Farm Letterpress & Publick House if you're local. 

A Simple & Surprising Trick to Make Your Ideas Crystal Clear

Hey hey, it's Wednesday!

And you know what that means...time to get your weekly dose of Visual.

This week's trick to clarify ideas is using white space intentionally. 

What comes to mind for you when you hear "white space"? For me, two things pop up. 
1) Mental clarity
2) More literally, intentionally leaving part of a graphic recording or painting untouched

I find that when I give myself time to clear my mind or step away from a project, even if it's just a few minutes, I'm then able to come back to it with more clarity and focus. And it turns out I'm not alone in that...here's an article from Fast Company about practicing mindfulness even when it feels like you don't have time.

In art, white space can be used to draw the viewer's attention to what is most important. In graphic facilitation, I find using white space helps the audience see the flow of information clearly, and makes the drawing less overwhelming when lots of information is being presented. 

Often when I'm working live graphic recording gigs, there will be so much fascinating and important information zooming around, before I know it my paper is filled to the edges. It is a continuous and conscientious practice to be sure I'm capturing what's most important and not over-crowding the chart. 

How can you use or create white space to be more effective and creative at work?

Here are some ideas for the office...
- Think you're all on the same page? MAKE SURE...write it down, draw some boxes and arrows, then leave some white space on the page so people can add, or by waiting a moment before speaking again to allow time for people to process, react, etc. This is often when the most creative or powerful idea emerge, when we allow a moment before responding (note to self...remember this!).
- If you're working collaboratively, leave a space in your document or iPad sketch to allow yourselves to add to later...who knows what new experiences might happen tomorrow or in the 5 minutes after the meeting that could illuminate a new path or idea!

If you feel like there are too many things flying around your mind to be able to focus, try...
- Taking at least five minutes to meditate -- sit quietly and focus on your breathing or take a stroll outside and try to count how many different bird songs you hear.
- Do a "brain dump" by writing down EVERYTHING that comes to mind. You can create a mind map, a list or just write stream of consciousness until everything is out.
- Grab an adult coloring book and spend some time in the zone. Don't have one? See the drawing below for some DIY ideas!

Remember to give yourself some white space so you can be crystal clear on what's most important for you, your team or your family...and sneak some creativity in to supercharge your day. 

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my emails and if you'd like, share this with someone you think would enjoy some white space!

Once again, thank you from my heart and soul for your support, great senses of humor, brilliant minds, collaboration and what you're each doing to make the world a better place.
 


 
Cheers, Karina


Where in the World is ConverSketch?

Last week I did an annual "Facilitation 101" training with undergraduate students in an environmental conflict management course at CSU. We focused on tools and techniques the students could use in stakeholder engagement processes as they move beyond their education and into internships and jobs in the environmental field. 


The Attitude of Gratitude

Good morning!

It's almost Thanksgiving, a time in the US where family, friends, and sharing time together are front-of-mind for many people. We appreciate what we have around us and take a moment to fill our hearts with gratitude (and our bellies with home-cooked meals).

I have a lot to be thankful for. And it's no secret, but I've found this to be true on so many occasions I cannot toss it up to chance: The more I appreciate the things around me, even the tiny things like finding a penny on the street, the more I find to appreciate, the more good things seem to come my way. (Side note: every time I see a coin on the street I pick it up and give a little thanks for the abundance in my life.)

So this week I encourage you to take a moment to be grateful for something, even small things, throughout your day. Find a trigger and think of something that makes you feel appreciation -- maybe it's when you look at your phone, or get up to get a drink of water. Just take a quick moment to give thanks for something or someone in your life. Heck, if you notice it makes you feel good or you're attracting more people or things you enjoy, keep it up through the new year and beyond!

This week I'm sharing some tips as a visual facilitator on drawing a little turkey, starting with some simple shapes. Add as much detail as you like! And if all else fails, you can be grateful you're not a turkey.

(Hint: click on the image below to see the larger version on the blog)

Now I want to hear from you!

Have you noticed a shift in energy if you have an attitude of gratitude? Do you have any tips on shifting from a funk to focusing on appreciation?

Upload your Sketch in the comments section below to share your unique style and inspire the community! And of course, any questions, epiphanies, and requests for future ConverSKETCHes!

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my emails and if you'd like, share this with people you're grateful for -- you never know how a kind word might affect someone's day.

Thanks for tuning in! Keep drawing and making your beautiful, authentic mark on this world!

Cheers, Karina



Grateful for your team and want to make your next meeting incredible? Get in touch with me to talk about your vision and how graphic recording can help people see how they depend on each other to get work done, and then let them know how much you appreciate them!

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

Ever wonder what it looks like to see a graphic recorder in action? Here I am capturing key ideas from a group of more than 80 citizens talking about important issues about Downtown Fort Collins. The event was facilitated by CSU students trained by the incredible Center for Public Deliberation.

And we're getting a new kitten! Here she is in all her tiny glory!

My Tip To Be Successful, No Matter What You're Doing

This week there have been some big changes here at ConverSketch HQ. No, I didn’t get an office kitten (yet). We moved into our first house! I can’t wait to get the studio space set up and know where to find things like pens again.

The two days before we moved I was graphically facilitating with the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing – they call themselves HCPF (pronounced hick-puff) – as they built a more collaborative and person-centered network of care providers around the state. Yeah, it sounds pretty forward-thinking, especially for a State agency, and it was. And the people I had the pleasure of working with from HCPF were incredibly hard-working and intelligent with a great sense of humor.

Their energy was contagious. I felt their desire to really make positive change for the people they serve, and it fired me up too. I wanted to do the best work I possibly could while practicing graphic facilitation for their conference. Even though the content was complex, I stayed focused during long days on doing the best work I could, because THEY were. (Here's a post I wrote about tapping into your creativity, if you're feeling stuck.)

And you know what? People were stoked on it. A bunch of people came and talked with me about what I was doing and how much they loved it. One of the incredible facilitation consultants told me she was “over” graphic recorders, but she loved what I was doing. We’re talking today about ways to keep working together in the future.


So what’s my tip to be successful in anything you do?

Do it with excellence. 
Do it with every ounce of hard work you can. Do it with joy. People will notice, and you’ll probably have more fun too. 

(Hint: click on the image below to see the larger version on the blog)

Now I want to hear from you!

Have you noticed a difference when you're doing your absolute best and practicing excellence? 

Upload your Sketch or share a story in the comments section below to share your unique style and inspire the community! And of course, any questions, epiphanies, and requests for future ConverSKETCHes!

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my emails and if you'd like, share this with people you know who do excellent work -- give them a little doodle thumbs up!

Thanks for tuning in! Keep drawing and making your beautiful, authentic mark on this world!

Cheers, Karina



Want to add some excellence to your next meeting, presentation or project? Get in touch with me to talk about your vision and how I can help.

Where in the World is ConverSketch?

Aside from the Colorado Medicare-Medicaid conference, I had the opportunity to serve as a guest "science professional" on a panel with students from Poudre High School interested in a program called Environmentors. I was a Mentor when I was a student at CSU, so taking time with an organization that encourages students to explore science is one way I enjoy giving back to the community. Science Rules!

Aside from the Colorado Medicare-Medicaid conference, I had the opportunity to serve as a guest "science professional" on a panel with students from Poudre High School interested in a program called Environmentors. I was a Mentor when I was a student at CSU, so taking time with an organization that encourages students to explore science is one way I enjoy giving back to the community. Science Rules!

What Could You Do With A New Beginning, and New Additions on the Farm

Happy September y'all!

This time of year in Colorado is beautiful, crisp and full of abundance (read: we finally have tomatoes in the garden!).

It's also a time of changes -- I've noticed the typical cooler mornings and gradually shorter days, and the garden and flowers are soaking up the end of the summer and putting on a lovely show. Businesses are starting to kick it back into high gear after summer vacations and I'm excited to be working on a few Explainer Videos this month.

Then there have been the less common fall changes...or should I say visitors? 

On Friday night we helped deliver and welcome 8 piglets to the world as Bubbles the pig had her second litter of the year. And we had the pleasure of watching a Monarch Butterfly as it emerged from its chrysalis by the front door...the inspiration for this week's drawing tip. You can see videos of both the Monarch and the piggies on my Instagram account. 

These have turned my thoughts toward how glad I am for seasonal changes throughout the year because they provide a reminder that I can reset and start fresh, as an individual and a business owner. 

Nothing is ever stagnant when you own a business, which is exhilarating, or exhausting (or both) depending on your frame of mind. When the seasons change, it is a reminder that I can decide how I want to respond to the uncertainties of life and business, I can decide if the change ends up as loss or if it becomes something beautiful, like the transformation of a Monarch Butterfly. 

Now, here’s this week's drawing tip:

When you're drawing, notice how little changes can make a big difference in how something looks, like stretching out circles to ovals as a caterpillar becomes a butterfly. Experiment and see how curving or straightening a line effects the feeling or motion of your drawing.

And speaking of observation, I wrote about how I get fired up to create high-quality, one-of-a-kind work like animated videos on a previous post.
 
Ready to give it a go?           (Hint: click on the image below to make it larger)

What changes are you noticing in yourself or your business this time of year? What are your favorite strategies to harness the power of change?

Share your Sketch or thoughts in the comments section below to show your unique style and inspire others! And of course, any questions, epiphanies, and requests for future ConverSKETCHes!

If you liked this tip, please sign up for my emails and if you'd like, and share this with friends you think might like a reminder to take a moment to reset and refocus as the season changes.

Thanks for reading, keep drawing YOUR inspiration, whatever that looks like for you to make your unique, positive difference in the world!

Cheers, Karina




Is your organization going through change? Get in touch to talk about how graphic recording can help clarify the complex and inspire action to move forward toward your goals. 
 

Where In The World Is ConverSketch?

This is a graphic recording I did over a couple of hours with City of Brighton. We asked citizens what they thought about the future of their city - see the sticky notes - and I illustrated it. Really working on those people and buildings!